7 Aesthetics


Meaning, Purpose, and Value

2.22-1 Meaning, purpose, and value are distinct, inseparable, and non-interchangeable.
To truly have any one of these, so must some part of each of the other two also be present.

2.22-2 Purpose has the nature of the omniscient.
Value has the nature of the transcendent.
Meaning has the nature of the immanent.

2.22-3 One's sense of meaning refers to the emotion (energy) of the subjective context of choice.
One's sense of purpose refers to the form of the subjective context of choice.
One's sense of value refers to the feeling of the subjective context of choice.

2.22-4 Purpose is defined in terms of dependence; one purpose has dependency on other purposes.
Value is defined in terms of interdependence; one value is interdependent with all other values.
Meaning is defined in terms of independence; each meaning is singular and stands unique unto itself (1).

2.22-5 Purposes combine in hierarchies and islands.
Values combine in levels and planes.
Meanings combine in webs and networks.

2.22-6 Within Self (as to that which is subjective):

Purpose is a measure of that which is internal
to the boundary of self,
value is a measure of that which is external
to the boundary of self, and
meaning is a measure of that which crosses
the boundary of self.

Within World, (as to that which is objective):

Purpose is a measure of the external potentiality of a thing
(its degree of perceived utility for oneself);
value is a measure of the internal potentiality of a thing
(its perceived utility for others); and
meaning is a measure of the potentiality between things.

2.22-7 Meaningfulness is the conjugation product of value and purpose. The degree to which an eventity is meaningful is proportional to the multiplicative product of the degree that the eventity has value and the degree that it has purpose.

2.22-8 Significance (meaningfulness) is zero positive.
Everything (every perception and expression) has (cannot not have) significance (some degree of meaningfulness). In significance, all perceptions and expressions have (cannot not have) some degree of purposefulness and value.

2.22-9 There is no single purpose, or any single value for, all of life, all of consciousness, all of beingness, in any world or domain. The purposes, values, and meaningfulness of each life, consciousness, and beingness, are always plural. No eventity or domain is ever without, or has just one purpose, value, or meaning.

2.22-10 Perception (experience, causality) is considered in terms of value. Expression (creativity, choice) is considered in terms of purpose. There is no expression that is without purpose. There is no perception or experience that is without value. All experiences have an equal value. All expressions have unequal purpose.

2.22-11 Value is always described, and is described from the inside towards the outside.
Purpose is always prescribed, and is prescribed from the outside towards the inside.

2.22-12 The nature of purpose is from the top to the bottom, from the largest to the smallest, and from without to within.
The nature of value is from the bottom to the top, from the smallest to the largest, and from within to without.

2.22-13 Potentialities (interdomain relations) have value. Actualities (intradomain relations) have purpose.
The degree of value associated with an eventity is proportional to the degree that the eventity has potentiality.
The degree of purpose associated with an eventity is proportional to the degree that the eventity has actuality.

2.22-14 The value of a tool is defined by the perceiver's subjective assessment of the potential uses to which a/the tool could be applied. The purpose of a tool is defined by the perceiver's objective assessment of the actual uses to which a/the tool has been applied.

2.22-15 Parallel Aspect; 1st: In absolute essence, all values are equal. Each value mutually supports every other value on the same level of being. No single value excludes or precludes any other. All values coexist and support all other values. Only by having all values may one have any values.

2.22-16 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: In absolute essence, all purposes are unequal to all other purposes. Each purpose on each level of being precludes all others on that same level of being. Purposes on one level of being may be component parts of those on other levels, implementing them. Only one purpose may be held at a time. Purposes will always contain or exclude other purposes.

2.22-17 The degree of the perfection of value is the product of the degree to which one values (perceives value in) all things (all experiences, all creativity, all of life), and the degree to which one values all things equally.

2.22-18 The degree of the perfection of purpose is the product of the degree of its depth, coherency, and basis within the self, and the degree that it is manifested (expressed) through other purposes and actions, with clarity, purity, and accuracy.

2.22-19 The strongest, most affirming and sustaining value is the acceptance of diversity in all creativity and experience. The deepest purpose, taking precedence over all others, is the desire to realize the maxima of creativity and experience (basal motivations).

2.22-20 The degree to which one realizes meaning -- and meaningfulness -- in life (the degree to which one's life is significant) is in proportion to the product of the degree of one's perfection of value (perception/experience) and the degree of one's perfection of purpose (expression/creativity).

2.22-21 The degree of meaningfulness (significance in life) is strongly, positively, and nonlinearly proportional to the degree of asymptotic approach to the perfection of value and of purpose.

2.22-22 The concepts of practicality and efficiency refer to purpose. Alone, they do not have value or meaning (2).

2.22-23 To consider progress is to assume purpose. What may be the purposes of one may not always be the purposes of another. Progress to one may be regress to another.

2.22-24 Life is its own purpose, value, and meaning (3). There is no greater purpose of life than to live.

2.22-25 Purpose is individual. Evolution is universal. Evolution is not progress. Evolution is the purpose of life to become more alive.

2.22-26 In that meaning, meaningfulness, and significance are cooperative, its derivative concepts -- purpose and value -- are also cooperative. Purposes which on the surface appear to be contradictory are at a deeper level of abstraction (in a more truthful reflection of desire) seen to be consonant.

All of consciousness, in all times and places (all worlds), have (ultimately and absolutely) the same purpose: to maximize the degree of both experience and creativity (the reality of love; the actuality of potentiality and the potentiality of all actuality).

All that is life, all that is alive, is valued and sacred.

2.22-27 To consider the maximum of information is to refer to only one level or domain of pattern.
To consider the maximum of meaning is to refer to many domains of pattern.

2.22-28 The greatest value and meaningfulness of a life occurs when one lives well and fully (with both purpose and value),
on all levels of being, in all worlds with which one is in contact.



Notes:
[1] The concepts of dependence, independence, and interdependence, taken as a triple, have one to one modality correspondences. The specific associations between these concepts and the modalities depend to some extent on the context of consideration in which they are used.

[2] To over emphasize purpose, function, and work, is to risk losing one's values, self worth, and feeling of the significance of life (the meaning of one's own and the value of all others).

[3] There is no life that is without significance, and there is no significance that is not alive.
Life and meaningfulness are intrinsic to one another; they are never separate.



Equanimity

2.23-1 A great degree of experience, creativity, or intimacy in one domain, does not, and cannot, replace experience creativity, or intimacy in any other domain. No amount of interaction, existence, and creation in any one world can replace any amount of interaction, existence, and creation in any other world.

2.23-2 It is possible and reasonable to value everything, to consider all life and all aspects of life as sacred.

2.23-3 The correction for obsession is not suppression, but extension. To move beyond obsession is not to dishonor that focus, but to widen it, to include other necessary aspects of one's life.

2.23-4 In an intuitive recognition of the equi-tempered (global) nature of value, one many come to expect that others will hold the same values as self. Resolution of misunderstandings of this type are corrected most naturally by the gradual adoption of all the values held by the other, (those not yet known to the self).

2.23-5 Values can be shared by all. However, it is not reasonable to believe that others will hold the same purposes as oneself (very unlikely except at especially deep layers of being). Purposes can be coordinated, but are infrequently shared. One cannot expect or convince others to hold the same purposes as oneself.

2.23-6 Meaning (in contrast with value and purpose) cannot be held either by self or other. Meaning is always (and only) in between. Meaning is neither given nor taken, neither shared nor not shared. Meaning is -- and has being -- at all scales, from the smallest to the ultimate (all).

2.23-7 Regardless of the value involved, one cannot enforce or impress any value on/upon another.

2.23-8 There are no necessary value conflicts. All values can be upheld and can co-exist without conflict.
The having of one value enables (does not, cannot ever, diminish) the capability to have other values.

It is ineffective to ask one to value something less; it is always more effective to ask one to value more.
All that can be asked is for one to value other things in addition to what they already value.

2.23-9 Where purpose can be considered in terms of logic, value is not logical (1).

2.23-10 Values are always defined positively. To express a value is to assert a willingness of acceptance.
To live a value is to fully accept the being of other (another, world).

2.23-11 Values are always defined in terms of content and never in terms of context.
Purposes are defined in terms of context and not in terms of content.

2.23-12 Value IS, and cannot not be. Value is unbounded and formless, and cannot be constrained or modified by anything which exists. One cannot not have values.

Complete non-acceptance is impossible. Complete isolation of self is impossible.

2.23-13 Where purpose, value, and meaning are explicit/objective, that want, need, and desire are implicit/ subjective.

2.23-14 Purpose is a reflection of want. Meaningfulness is a reflection of desire. Value is a reflection of need.

2.23-15 In that love is unconditional (unconditional love), acceptance is also unconditional (unconditional acceptance).
The effective realization of either one necessarily implies the effective realization of the other.

Spirit is known best by (divinity only asks for) both love and gratitude. The action of Love is to give potentiality (to the world). The action of Gratitude is to receive potentiality (from the world). One feels gratitude -- and allows a feeling of thankfulness -- when one accepts, and has acceptance. The action of love and gratitude is the action of spirituality, of connecting oneself with the divine.

2.23-16 Values are realized, clear, and pure in proportion to the degree to which they are specific, known, and local to self (2).

2.23-17 To realize value in process, in one's own personal life, is to move from the transcendent into the immanent. The greater the clarity and the more positive the statement of value, the more meaningful and rapid its resolution in manifestation.



Notes:
[1] There can be no disagreement about values, only about purposes. If one were engaged in an argument about one's values, than that argument is fundamentally irresolvable and shall be dropped without conclusion. Values cannot transcend themselves (Any attempt to do so is to leave the system of values, and to shift into the realm of purpose).

[2] To realize and implement "I love everything" (as a value) is vague, difficult, and ambiguous, whereas to enumerate one's values in detail is to allow for more immediate and direct realization.



The Meaning of Art

2.24-1 The degree of meaningfulness associated with an eventity (such as a work of art or a play) is proportional to the degree of coherent selectivity that is defined by selective choice(s) that compose that eventity. The more the details of an eventity are known as being causality, deterministically, or logically defined, the less meaningful (significant) it will be. A high degree of coherency in a field of choices (choices which are otherwise unconstrained, and which therefore implement a high degree of synchronicity) is inherently meaningful (perceptually significant).

2.24-2 To know the meaning/significance of an event is similar in nature to knowing the meaning of a statement; one must know the context (language) and content (things) to which the statement refers. The meaningfulness of an eventity does not have locus within it, but is inseparable, intrinsically associated with it.

2.24-3 The degree of seeming comprehensibleness of an eventity in factual terms is inversely proportional to the degree of seeming meaningfulness of that eventity. Significance is positively proportional to knowing and inversely proportional to understanding. Eventities which have mythic, mystic, or mysterious qualities will tend to have greater significance than eventities (arts) which are purely factual and structural. The more one comprehends this world (in terms of laws and facts) the less one finds significance and meaningfulness in life.

Truth has the modality of the immanent. Fact has the modality of the omniscient. Myth has the modality of the transcendent.

2.24-4 Form acts as a filter against feeling. Form does not create feeling where there is none so much as it filters it; much as colored glass will filter white light. The greater the diversity of forms involved (in any single level or domain of representation), the fewer and weaker will be the qualities and intensities available.

Tools and instruments (defined in terms of form, function, and purpose) modify, enable, and filter expression and creativity.
Art and consumables (defined in terms of feeling, quality, and value) modify, enable, and filter perception and experience.

The meaningfulness of a tool is proportional to the degree that its being involves a change in objective potentiality.
The meaningfulness of an art is proportional to the degree that its being involves a change in subjective actuality.

2.24-5 Art, when evaluated in terms of quality, must be understood in terms of subtractive synthesis,
rather than in terms of additive synthesis.
Art increases in effectiveness when it employs a maximal diversity of levels of representation (has multiple aspects or communicates within multiple domains) (1).

2.24-6 Form is significant to the extent that it is unique and singular in expression. Feeling is emphasized (and quality increases) to the extent that a form is plural and perfectly similar (as in multiple expressions of the same form).

Where in repetition of expression, the meaningfulness of a singularity of form (monism of quality) dissolves into a plurality of qualities, and quality increases.

To the extent that a form is singular, separate, and unique, it acts as a focus and a boundary (division) in the flow of awareness. When a form is plural -- part of a continuity of pattern, and is everywhere similar -- it acts as a medium of (a conduit to the flow of) awareness.

2.24-7 Where there is too much repetition of form, and not enough diversity (singularity and uniqueness) of form,
a redundancy and incompleteness of the filtering of feeling results (loss of purity and efficiency).
Where there is too much diversity of form, and not enough repetition (continuity and similarity),
too many qualities feeling are blocked without discrimination (again a loss of purity and effectiveness).
Effective (potent) art will have the right balance in the diversity and similarity of form
(good art has neither too few patterns of form nor too many).

2.24-8 Great art consists of the right balance (quantity) of forms and patterns in diverse levels and combinations of being. In a work of great art, all of the forms chosen (out of the range of all possible forms, components, substances, aspects, patterns, etc.) result in the selection of one single specific quality of feeling (regardless of the diversity involved).

In the best works, all aspects and all references of the art are in alignment with all of the other aspects and references of the art (with respect to the art itself). Effective art is art with an internal agreement. No other forms or patterns than those strictly necessary are present.

2.24-9 Art which presents the greatest possible intensity and purity of feeling (a feeling which has a definite and specific quality), using the smallest total number of (effective and selective) elements and forms (in combination with a diversity of levels of representation), is considered to be the best. Art has significance and meaningfulness in proportion to the degree that the selections of the forms employed are maximally coherent in defining a single, pure, and intense, quality of feeling.

An event of art is effective in proportion to the degree that it has many and diverse interconnected layers and abstractions of coherent meaning, experienced at multiple layers and depths of consciousness.

2.24-10 Art will be highly valued in proportion to the depth within self (towards one's inner being) at which its quality of feeling peaks in both purity and intensity. The greater the degree of depth, intensity, and purity of the feeling of the art within self, the greater its value will be.

2.24-11 Where for all scales of consciousness, the experiences in life which touch most deeply will also be the those which are the most valued. The popularity and fame (diffusion) of a work of art (in a culture) is therefore in partial proportion to its depth of affect (for the members of that culture) (2).



Notes:
[1] Significance (effectiveness) in art is increased with proper impedance matching across levels of representation, much as multiple filters used in combination can achieve better effects (in terms of both purity and efficiency of energy transmission) than using only one. The concept of purity here is to be understood as "consisting of a single quality of feeling", while the concept of "energy efficiency" is analogous to the concept of intensity.

[2] Sex, drugs, passion, peak experiences, and great art, -- all of which affect the psyche at deeper levels than the everyday -- will be the subjects of intense interest both individually and culturally. An experience which is felt at once by many aspects of self, at various depths of feeling, will overall be more generally satisfying than those which involve only a few layers or aspects.



The Power of Art

2.25-1 The degree of generality of a work of art (the larger the percentage of the population perceiving that art that would be affected by it) is proportional to both the degree that the origin of the art is removed from the level of the boundary of the self of the artist and the degree to which the work has originality.

2.25-2 The degree of mastery (a metric of power) in an artist is positively proportional to the quantity of art produced and the quality of art produced, and inversely proportional to the time taken to produce it.

2.25-3 The quality (and affect) of the perception of a work of art is in proportion to the depth (originality), intensity (clarity of passion), and purity (singularity of quality), of the feeling of the artist in creating that work (1).

2.25-5 The degree of mastery in a single work of art is proportional to its (the product of the degrees that the work has) originality, generality, and effectiveness.

2.25-6 Originality has the nature of the transcendent.
Effectiveness (intensity) has the nature of the immanent modality.
Generality (purity) has the nature of the omniscient modality.

2.25-4 2.25-7 The influence that a work of art has on a society (a power of change) is proportional to the product of its degree of distribution (number of individuals who see it) and the degree of feeling impact that it creates in each individual. The rapidity of the diffusion of a work of art (the rate at which it spreads within a culture) is proportional to its degree of originality. The degree of depth (evocative of feeling) of a work of art is proportional to its degree of generality.



Notes:
[1] This works in much the same manner that the quality of the response to a question often is a reflection of the quality of the question asked.


The Strength of Art

2.26-1 With increasing subjective time,
knowing increases when moving gradually from the macroscopic towards the microscopic, and
understanding increases when moving gradually from the microscopic towards the macroscopic.

2.26-2 Both perception and expression are (always involve) choice, cause, and change.
Expression (as change) always involves an addition of information/pattern/structure (as defined by choice)
to causality (as a dynamic of in-struct-ion).
Perception (as change) always involves a removal (as defined by choice) of information/pattern/structure
from causality (as a dynamic of ab-stract-ion).

2.26-3 Feelings, although they cannot be long held, are kept within the self (memory).
Forms, although they can be held long, cannot be kept within the world (change).

2.26-4 For one's life to be meaningful (to behold of significance),
the feelings within self must become forms in the world, and
the forms within world must become feelings in the self.

2.26-5 The degree of subjective meaningfulness is the product of the total amount of organizing effect that it has on one's perception and the rapidity with which this organizing takes place.

2.26-6 The degree of objective meaningfulness is the sum of the degrees to which the organizing effect on each individual perception is similar to the organizing effect on all other individuals.

2.26-7 Where intellect (power in thinking) is conjugate to one's sensitivity and value of feeling/quality, so will people of rare ability value (a refinement of) art as much as they value logical and practical achievement (whereas ordinary people will see these values as opposites).

2.26-8 Instead of trying to make life easy or comfortable (practical), try to make it creative and joyful (artistic). Life is significant, meaningful, more than it is purposeful or valued. The purpose and value of one's life will always find its basis in the meaningfulness of one's life.

2.26-9 The significance (the value and meaning) of a single life can only be known by its connections to other lives. The significance of a single world can be known only by its connections to other worlds. To know the meaning of any existence (any single life), one must know the meaning of many existences (many lives, many worlds and domains).

2.26-10 The significance (meaningfulness) of something, anything, any life, event or action (eventity), is present tense; it is not defined by the past or by its eventual future. Significance in the present defines the meaning of the past, and the significance of the future. Meaningfulness defines both value and purpose.

The essence of something is not defined by its purpose, its ultimate conclusion, its ultimate destination, or ultimate form. Rather, essence is always known in terms of significance. To say that something has had value in the past, or to say that something will have purpose in the future, is only to know significance in the present; neither more, nor less. The meaningfulness of an eventity, of a self, a life, is independent of its temporality.

2.26-11 Significance is scale, position, and direction invariant.

It does not matter what size, what duration, how permanent or impermanent something (anything, any eventity) may be, its significance will be the same regardless. Significance does not depend on large and small, high or low, near or far; it applies at all levels of being equally. The significance of a life does not depend on where they live, who they know, what they have, or what they do. Innate significance is independent of all state and function, worth and means.


Novelty

3.55-1 The significance of a work of art is proportional to the degree that it creates connections, connectivity, and a continuity of being (tradition).

Essence (significance) is not defined by an ultimate conclusion, symbology, or ultimate form.
Rather, it is known by its meaningfulness in the present tense.

3.56-1 Effective art involves a shift in the balance of novelty (difference) and rhythm (sameness).
Awareness/attention tends to focus at the level/depth of consciousness where the maximal difference/variation is.

3.56-2 The focus of awareness (the surface of consciousness) is where there is maximal subjective novelty (uniqueness of interaction). The levels and rates of the various strata of consciousness are defined by the level of relativistic novelty that appears at each level. The greater the level of habituation/automation, the greater the level of unconsciousness.

3.57-5 There is a difference between a repetition of omniscient form, and a repetition of transcendent form.

A repetition of omniscient form would be having many copies of the same eventity in close organized proximity in the same domain.

A repetition of transcendental forms refers to a commonality of essence in widely differing and diverse representations.

3.57-6 The effectiveness of art is in part proportional to the degree of a unity in the plurality of transcendental aspects (1).

3.58-3 Art is effective in proportion to the degree that it has many diverse interconnected layers of coherent meaning.
Art experienced at once by many aspects of self, for each participant, at various depths of feeling,
will overall be more generally satisfying than art involving only a few layers or aspects.

3.58-4 For all of the forms, aspects, and components, art is more effective to the degree that each component creates a similar quality of feeling, regardless of the diversity of the forms and substances of the components themselves (2).

3.58-5 Coherency, unity, and continuity have the nature of the transcendental modality.
Meaningfulness and personal significance have the nature of the immanent modality.
Form and implementation have the nature of the omniscient modality.

3.58-6 Rule of Precedence:
A class of form precedes an instance of coherency, unity, or continuity.
A class of coherency and unity precedes an instance of meaning.
A class of meaningfulness precedes an instance of form and implementation.



Notes:
[1] Repeated forms can refer to a commonality of essence across various sounds, shapes, images, smells, movements, and textures.

[2] Ideally, every symbol (and each connotation and reference of each symbol) used must be in alignment with all other aspects.
The effectiveness of a work of art is in proportion to the degree that all aspects and components agree
(in the nature of their essential feeling/potentiality) with one other.



Artistic Communication

2.31-1 Parallel Aspect; 1st: The degree to which communication (both perception and expression) is literal (horizontal) and has power (purpose) to convince and persuade (persuasiveness, pervasiveness) is proportional to the degree that it involves a transition in scale from the microscopic (detail) towards the mesoscopic within one domain of representation only.

The greater the degree that the content of communication involves a movement of one's awareness from (precise) minute details back towards the natural ranges (scale) of one's life, the more that the communication has expressive power, can be interpreted literally, and will persuade and convince one of its truth. This effect will be in proportion to the degree of difference in scale between the microscopic (very minute and small details, precisely defined) and the mesoscopic (i.e., of normal/ordinary size) eventities consistently involved in the communication.

2.31-2 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: The degree to which communication (vision and intuition) is symbolic (vertical) and has strength, value, significance, and insight (nurtures motivation) is proportional to the degree that it involves a transition in scale from the macroscopic (overview) towards the mesoscopic within many domains of representation.

The greater the degree that the content of communication involves a movement of one's awareness from a (accurate) wide ranging overview back towards the natural ranges of one's life, the more that the communication has perceptive strength, must be interpreted figuratively/symbolically, and has greater insight, significance, and meaningfulness (mythic value). This effect will be in proportion to the degree of difference in scale between the macroscopic (very large scale and general features, accurately described) and the mesoscopic eventities consistently involved in the communication.

2.31-3 The degree of the span of an expression (the degree of change from microscopic to mesoscopic) is proportional to
the number and degree of the intradomain relations of the eventities involved in that expression.
The degree of the span of a perception (the degree of change from macroscopic to mesoscopic) is proportional to
the number and degree of the interdomain relations of the eventities involved in that perception.

2.31-4 The process of communication is an isomorph with the process of the relation between self and reality.
The concept of a language is an isomorph to the concept of a domain (1).

2.31-5 Parallel Aspect; 1st: The degree to which a world (reality) will seem to be literal (realistic) is proportional to the product of 1) the degree that the mesoscopic structure of a domain is described as being composed of (defined by) microscopic intradomain interactions and 2) the degree of difference in scale between that microscopic scale and the mesoscopic scale.

2.31-6 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: The degree to which a world (reality) will seem to be symbolic (idealistic) is proportional to the product of 1) the degree that the mesoscopic structure of a domain is described as being coordinated by (described by) macroscopic interdomain interactions and 2) the degree of difference in scale between that macroscopic scale and the mesoscopic scale.

2.31-7 A symbol (a work of art, eventity, life of self, a subjective expression, etc.) has value, connotation, potentiality, and strength in proportion to the number of interdomain relationships which describe it (transcendent).

A symbol (life, etc.) has purpose, denotation, actuality, and power in proportion to the number of intradomain relationships which define it (omniscient).

A symbol, an eventity (life, etc.) has meaning (meaningfulness) in proportion to the product of the number and the degree of the interdomain and intradomain relations in which that symbol (eventity, self) is so involved (immanent).



Notes:
[1] By understanding the inherent dynamics of all communication, one can better understand the metaphysics of creation, interaction, and existence ('the Universe').


Representations and Commitments

2.32-1 The process of communication is best facilitated when each participant (freely, honestly, and fully) grants to the other these three rights:.
1) the right to speak,
2) the right to be understood, and
3) the right to know that one has been understood.
Communication between people does not happen unless and until all three of these rights have been (at least implicitly) granted (from each to the other). These rights of communication cannot be taken, they can only be given.

2.32-2 Where there is a single channel of communication (one context), there are two types of statement (a plural content). The essence of all communication acts are resolved into exactly and only two aspects: All statements (in all domains of communication) either define a representation or make a commitment (or both; no other roles or purposes are fundamental).

Representative statements reflect what is (an actuality).
Commitment statements reflect what could be (a potentiality).

A representation is a statement of perception, of actuality,
which describes a quantity, a pattern, or a form.
A commitment is a statement of expression, of potentiality,
which proscribes a quality, an essence, a feeling.

2.32-4 The event of forming a commitment is the event of a change/transformation of potentialities. It is a change in the potentialities of the future expressions of the one making the commitment, and it is a change in the potentialities of the perceptions of the common future of the one receiving the commitment.

2.32-5 The event of forming a representation is the event of a change/transformation of actualities. It is a transformation or mapping of some aspect to the form of something in some world (as an actuality) to a form or structure within a domain of language (itself also an actuality).

2.32-3 Where communication has the nature of the modality of the immanent, that representation has the nature of the modality of the omniscient, and commitment has the nature of the modality of the transcendent.

2.32-6 The realization of a representation is measured by the degree of the potentiality of perceiving a symmetry of the form (actuality) of events across different objective spaces in the same subjective time.
The realization of a commitment is measured by the degree of the actuality of perceiving a symmetry of the feeling (potentiality) of events across different times in the same subjective space.

2.32-7 Any process of communication, comparison, and agreement inherently and intrinsically involves an increase in the degree of both subjectivity and objectivity, existence and creation.


Transformation

2.33-1 Information begins and ends in objectivity. Communication begins and ends in subjectivity. Information is defined in terms of form, quantity, discontinuity (quantization), and symmetry (addition and subtraction). Communication is defined in terms of feeling, quality, asymmetry, and continuity (multiplication).

2.33-2 The content of communication is form (information). As such, the greater the degree that something is subjective, the larger the number of transformations that are required to express it (i.e., as necessary to convert/transform feeling into form).

2.33-3 Where considered as a process, a dynamic of action, communication is isomorphic with interaction (experience, creativity), and similar intrinsics will be involved. Communication intrinsically involves a distinction between the objective and the subjective, a specific content of the objective, an asymmetry and directiveness of flow, a positive degree of intensity and energy, transformation, and a loss or gain of gauge constants (details of transformation).

2.33-4 Within the dynamics of communication (i.e., the self-to-world relation), the following correspondences hold:.

Statements (events) are objective (i.e., as the purely static).
Selves are subjective (i.e., as the purely dynamic).
Expression is instructive
(i.e., a change from feeling into form).
Perception is abstractive
(i.e., a change from form into feeling).
Proscription is temporal
(i.e., as defined in choice, the making of a commitment).
Description is spatial
(i.e., as defined in causality, the representation of relations).

2.33-5 Within the correspondences of communication, the following assertions hold:.

Selves express and perceive statements (eventities).
Expression and perception can be either proscriptive or descriptive.
Statements and selves can be regarded as acting in a manner which is either proscriptive or descriptive.

2.33-6 Each degree of (coherent) transformation is isomorphic with energy. Translation process, the dynamics of translation, are always finite. The energy of any single expression, any single communication, or any single eventity, will always be finite (with respect to a given world). Communication itself (as an eventity/expression) is always unbounded (without absolute extent) (1).

2.33-7 All communication process involves transformation as an intrinsic. All transformation/translation involves both abstraction (differentiation, removing pattern, loss of a gauge constant) and instruction (integration, gain of a gauge constant).

Transformation has the nature of the immanent.
Abstraction has the nature of the omniscient.
Instruction has the nature of the transcendent.

2.33-8 Any representation of an eventity encodes additional information (external to the eventity represented) than that which is (purely) contained in the eventity itself. It is impossible to represent pure pattern or form without additional details (particular to the representation itself) also being manifest. There is no absolute form of encoding. It is possible, however, to represent something without losing information (details/specifications).

2.33-9 There is no pure translation process. The translation of a statement from one language to another will always involve additional specification in the new language that was not present in the original language, a specification which is solely an aspect of the translation process itself (2).

2.33-10 The concept of translation is isomorphic with the concept of interaction/perception/expression. The concept and being (process) of both perception and of expression are isomorphs with the concept of language translation.

2.33-11 Perception is converted (transformed) into experience by a process of abstraction, the conversion of form and detail into feeling and meaning. Creativity is converted into expression by a process of instruction (as in the action of to put 'into structure'), the conversion of desire and intention into specification and material.

1.57-7 &8 The essence of the mental (subjective) aspects of a self-to-reality interaction may be resolved into four distinct concepts: information, knowing, understanding, and wisdom. The meanings of each of these may be resolved by the staticism and dynamicism of perception and expression. They may further be resolved as a metric of the content through an interaction and as a metric of the context across an interaction.

Information is about the form of the content of what is perceived through a perceptual channel.
The essence of the meaning of the concept of information refers to a/the static and omniscient aspect of subjective perception.

Knowing is about the feeling of the context that is perceived across a perceptual channel.
The essence of the meaning of the concept of knowing refers to a/the dynamic and transcendent aspect of subjective perception.

Understanding is about the form of the content expressed through a channel of expression.
The essence of the meaning of the concept of understanding refers to a/the static and omniscient aspect of subjective expression.

Wisdom is about the feeling (context) that is expressed across a channel of expression.
The essence of the meaning of the concept of wisdom refers to a/the dynamic and transcendent aspect of subjective expression.

2.33-12 Perception, experience, and abstraction have the essence and nature of the modality of the Omniscient.
Expression, creativity, and instruction have the essence and nature of the modality of the transcendent.
Considered together, and without directivity, these processes, as interaction and transformation,
have the nature and essence of the modality of the Immanent.

Unto itself, perception (existence) is always complete. Expression (creation) is always incomplete.

2.34-1 There can be no raw data;
sensory experience is never simple.
Whereas a perception may be simple,
an experience is always complex.

2.34-2 There is no such process as a "direct perception";
there is only direct experience.
All of one's experiences are direct experiences.
There are no indirect experiences.
Experience (immanent) is always direct;
perception (omniscient) is always indirect (3).

2.34-3 All experiences are valid, valued, and valuable. No one experience is any less, or any more, valid than any other.
Experiences of lesser intensity are as valid as experiences of greater intensity.



Notes:
[1] As such, a point is reached at which it becomes impractical to express the nature of a content beyond a certain degree of subjectivity.

[2] There is no statement which is without context, without a language. Meaning is never pure. Meaningfulness cannot be, or be known, without also being in part encoded in a representation, and therefore including something in addition to (other than) the (pure) meaning itself.

[3] Example: To hear about the experiences of another is to have a direct experience of listening.



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