5 The Practice of Being


The Action of Choice

1.66-7 All choice is cooperative. Choice can only be given, never taken.

1.66-8 All choice involves both freedom and limitation. No choice can be made which does not involve both.

1.65-8 The focus and strength of choice is at a maximum at that location where attention is at a maximum. The orientation/position of attention defines the nature, range, and possible effects of choice. A change in the orientation/position/scale of attention necessarily implies a change in the nature, range, and possible effects of choice.

1.65-7 One can only make choices in the present. One cannot choose in the past, or in the future.

1.65-11 Choice (and to a lesser extent, cause and change) is an intrinsic of consciousness. No one and no thing (nothing) can take away the reality and beingness of choice for any self. Others may be able to influence what choices are apparently available, but they cannot influence the fact that self makes choice. Choice is Truly Owned.

1.65-12 Where considered as an absolute (actual, impersonal, objective), no particular scale of interaction is any more important, specific, or meaningful (purposeful or valued) than any other. All scales (and all positions) of being will have some positive (non-zero) degree of purpose, value, and meaningfulness (1).

The degree to which there seems to be greater apparent purpose in the direction of the macroscopic will be in direct proportion to the degree to which it seems apparent that there are greater degrees of meaningfulness in the direction of the microscopic.

1.65-14 Choice applies and is available to all of being, and all levels/aspects of being, for all time (2).
There is no single level or 'unit' of being at which choice only applies, for all of self chooses when choice is.
Each aspect of self has choice. There is no part or level of self which is without choice.

1.65-15 The realization of choices at more encompassing levels of being is in the degree of the coordination of the choices which are distributed across the many selves of the encompassed levels of being (3).

1.65-17 The freedom of the self to realize potential is directly related to the internal coherency/consistency/continuity of that self. Where self is divided internally, there is much less freedom of choice.

1.65-18 When desires are confused (i.e., are internally conflicting or are unclear), or when one has conflicting ideas and beliefs, one has effectively become two smaller transcendent selves, each of which has significantly less freedom of choice. One chooses most effectively when one chooses as a unified self, as a whole being, with attunement (at-one-ment) with one's own innermost (true and basic) desires.

Desires are interrelated. They do not occur in isolation, but are interdependent with various desires having various degrees of depth. Some desires take their form as an implementation of a deeper desire. The knowledge, resolution, and attainment of root/fundamental desires lessens (or removes altogether) the intensity of superficial and surface desires (which are often more conflicted). Surface desires are resolved (clarified) when deeper desires are known. When surface desires appear to be in conflict, a knowing of deeper desires will give rise to a resolution of that conflict.

1.65-19 The degree of individual freedom is strongly (non-linearly) proportional to the degree of cooperation and coordination among individuals. A society/culture is strong to the degree that each is allowed to creatively live, and live together.

A maximum of both (the acceptance of) diversity and (the expression of) unity is necessary for nation (society, tradition, religion, culture) to be strong. The degree of strength of a nation is known as much through its flexibility and tolerance (an acceptance of diversity) as through its commitments and follow-through.



Notes:
[1] However, from a personal perspective, it must appear that greater levels of meaningfulness are available (possible, potential) in the direction of smaller scales, and that greater levels of purposefulness are available in the direction of larger scales.

For example, in the domain of language, a word has greater semantic possibility than a sentence, and a letter has greater semantic possibility than a word.

[2] The subconscious, unconscious (deep consciousness of) mind chooses (as consciously) as much as does the (surface/ego) conscious mind (the mind of which one is aware).

[3] For example, the realization of the choice to go to college is realized in a coordination (organization) of many smaller day-to-day choices to go to class, do one's homework, study, etc.



The Intensity of Choice

1.64-1 The concept of energy is isomorphic with the concept of changes of state.
To refer to objective energy is to refer to the potentiality of changes in actuality.
To refer to subjective energy is to refer to the actuality of changes in potentiality.

1.64-2 The actualization of choice results in changes of state (as subjectively perceived). Making a choice requires subjective energy, a strength of self to maintain a coherent organization of potentialities across a (subjective) volume of self.

The strength (energy) of a choice is proportional to the number of alignments (sub-choices) necessary to bring about the actuality of consequence.

1.64-3 1.64-4 The total intensity of personal expression (choice bandwidth, personal power) is defined to be the product of
the density (the number of choices) and the frequency of expression (the rate at which choices are made).
Intensity is proportional to the product of density and frequency (density and frequency are conjugate).

1.64-5 Intensity has the nature of the modality of the immanent.
Density has the nature of the modality of the omniscient.
Frequency has the nature of the modality of the transcendent.

1.64-6 All interactions have intensity, and therefore degrees of density and frequency. No interaction can persist unchanged forever (in either subjective or objective time). All connectedness (continuity) has cycle and vibration (frequency).

1.64-7 Existence (the universe) abhors a vacuum (the absence of mass). Consciousness abhors stasis (the absence of force). Spirit (deity) abhors fixation (limitation, closure, boundary; the absence of probability).

That which is consciousness (life/alive) must (cannot not) change.


Self of Choice

1.65-4 2.51-6 One's being, the eventity of self, is the product of
the sum of all of the choices that one has made, and
the sum of all of the choices that one could make.

1.67-2 Self is the appearance of the aggregation of that aspect of interaction which is choice.
Reality (world) is the appearance of the aggregation of that aspect of interaction which is causality.

1.67-3 In the same manner that world, existence, and causality are mutually inseparable, the concepts of self (consciousness), creation, and choice are mutually inseparable. 1.67-1 Experience (perception, causality), and creativity (choice and expression) are together more basic and intrinsic than both self (belief and personality) and reality (objective otherness).

The existence, reality (being), and objectivity (and subjectivity) of both self and world are created out of interaction.
All experience and expression (interaction) is known and understood in the terms of choice, change, and cause.

1.65-10 A/any/the/all worlds and selves change. There can be no world or self, nor any part of world/self that does not have some non-zero positive degree of change and evolution. One cannot not change. Nothing cannot not change.

1.65-1 The essence of the concept of choice is resolved into exactly three necessary and sufficient concepts.
Choice is a process of potentiality, selection, and consequence (1).
Without any of these, there is no choice (an impossible condition).

1.65-6 The strength of feeling that one has choice is the (multiplicative) product of:.

a) the degree to which one perceives (the form of) that they have a range of options to choose from,
b) the degree that each option has actuality/consequence (power), and
c) the degree that the selection of such option is perceived to be unconstrained (2).

1.66-1 Choice, freedom, and potentiality although real, have no position or substance. Choice/freedom/potential have no size or location and cannot be analyzed, deconstructed, or decomposed into simpler parts.

In that the overwhelming majority of one's being is here and now, so also are one's choices most effective here and now. Focus in the present concentrates the effectiveness of choices.

1.65-5 Self does not own or have choice; rather self is the evolving context of many choices.
The self arises out of the many common contexts of choice (3).
The nature of choice is more basic, more fundamental, than the nature of self.

1.65-9 A/any/the/all worlds will contain some degree of selfness, and these selves will always have some positive (non-zero) degree of effective choice with/within/in that world/domain. All effective choice will have causal consequences and implement real/actual changes.

1.65-13 There is no particular 'source' (no location, no scale) for the content (specification) of a choice.
Choice is not 'a property' of any system (domain or self), so much as an intrinsic of all systems.

1.65-2 Neither choice, nor change, nor causality, has the nature of being deterministic and/or completely logical.

1.65-3 Choice cannot be explained. It can only be described.
Choice can never be a subject of physical theory; it can only be a topic of metaphysical theory.

1.66-2 Choices must appear, at some level of abstraction, to be fundamentally unpredictable to all others, and thus, indistinguishable from pure/true randomness in the domain. The actuality of the perception of "an-other's" choice (as choices not made by the self) is also (must be, must appear to be) indistinguishable from pure randomness. Choice is not random, however, in that it is subjectively meaningful, whereas true randomness is not.



Notes:
[1] For choice to be choice, it must have consequences. A choice that has no effects, or whose effects can be completely undone, is not actually a choice at all (i.e., is meaningless, by Principle of Identity).

If there is a potentiality and selection of "not choosing", when such selection has real consequences and effects, such selection must necessarily also be considered a choice.

[2] The beingness of choice, the idea of free will and self-determination, is the feeling sense that one has of choosing something without external influence, without reason, without any external or logical compulsion, aside from the feeling of desire from deep within the self.

Ultimately, there will always be an aspect of personal choice which is not dictated by anything external to oneself. One always has a certain degree of non-determinism (appearance of randomness) in one's choices.

[3] Technically, it is better to assert that 'choice makes self' or that choice has Self. Self is an intrinsic of choice. The IDM metaphysics regards the idea 'self has or makes choice' as inherently inaccurate. Choice is not 'owned' or 'had' by the self so much a singularity of self (the common context of selection) is the outcome of a multiplicity of choices. In the terminology of Axiom II, Self is Truly Owned by Choice, rather than the reverse.



The Six Paths

1.91-1 The totality of the relationship between self and reality is understood in terms of six subjects, six paths (1).
These may be known as spirituality, religion, science, technology, mysticism, and magic.

1.91-2 Art is the combination of technology, religion, and the working of magic.
Philosophy is a combination of science, spirituality, and mysticism.
Metaphysics is the integration (and unifying basis) of all six paths into a common whole.

1.91-3 Greatness has aspects of form (as in ideas) and feeling (as in arts).

The most effective philosophies, the greatest ideas of an age,
have equal components of science, spirituality, and mysticism.
The most effective arts, the greatest works of art in an age,
have equal components of technology, religion, and magic.

The greatest ideas of an age involve a scientific perspective, in that there needs to be a discipline, rigor, and clarity of thinking. A great idea involves spirituality, in that it requires high degrees of acceptance and openness, (a beginner mind), to be appreciated in the context of one's previous assumptions, presuppositions, and beliefs. A great idea involves deep insight, intuition, and the qualities of feeling, dreaming and the unconsciousness of a mystic, as much as it does of thought and work. Only when significant degrees of all three (science, spirituality, and mysticism) are used together is there any chance of developing a new, great philosophy.

A great work of art involves technology in the effective execution and skill of the artist (the artist's technique). A great work of art involves religion as a source of the archetypal symbols and languages needed to convey an insightful meaning. A great work of art involves magic in its deep ability to change the perception, attention, and consciousness (state of feeling) of anyone who experiences/perceives that work of art. Only when all three (technology, religion, and magic) are present in significant degree is a new, great work of art able to be created.

1.91-4 Spirituality is a way of perceiving which begins with the transcendent modality (soul), transitions to the immanent modality (life), and completes with the omniscient modality (integrity).

Religion is a way of expressing which begins with the transcendent modality (ideals), transitions to the immanent modality (action), and completes with the omniscient modality (community).

Science is a way of perceiving which begins with the immanent modality (observation), then transitions to the omniscient modality (description/theory), and completes with the transcendent modality (experiment).

Technology is a way of expressing which begins with the immanent modality (decision), transitions to the omniscient modality (design), and completes with the transcendent modality (implementation).

Mysticism is a way of perceiving which begins with the omniscient modality (body technique), transitions to the transcendent modality (diffusion of self), and completes with the immanent modality (realization/enlightenment).

Magic is a way of expressing which begins with the omniscient modality, transitions to the transcendent modality (ritual), and completes with the immanent modality.

1.91-5 The Path Transformations of Question:
The essential question of spirituality is Who.
The essential question of religion is Where.
The essential question of science is Why.
The essential question of technology is How.
The essential question of mysticism is When.
The essential question of magic is What.

1.91-6 The Essence of Theory:
Spirituality is a description/explanation of change; the world in terms of a self.
Religion is a proscription/prediction of change; self in terms of a world.
Science is a description/explanation of causality.
Technology is a proscription/prediction of causality.
Mysticism is a description/explanation of choice.
Magic is a proscription/prediction of choice.

1.91-7 The Essence of Practice:
Science is an exploration of objective value.
Technology is an expression of objective purpose.
Spirituality is an exploration of subjective meaning.
Religion is an expression of objective meaning.
Mysticism is an exploration of subjective value.
Magic is an expression of subjective purpose.

1.91-8 Path Essence of Action:
Science is about the description and theory of objective eventities.
Technology is about the definition and creation of objective eventities.
Spirituality is about the integration of objective eventities into a subjective eventity.
Religion is about the integration of subjective eventities into an objective eventity.
Mysticism is about the description and theory of subjective eventities.
Magic is about the definition and creation of subjective eventities.

1.91-9 What Comes Before, What the Means are, and What the Outcome is:

There must be acceptance before there is learning.
There must be learning before there is spirituality.
There must be spirituality before there is acceptance.

There must be knowledge before there is method.
There must be method before there is science.
There must be science before there is knowledge.

There must be wisdom before there is divination.
There must be divination before there is mysticism.
There must be mysticism before there is wisdom.

There must be symbol before there is ceremony.
There must be ceremony before there is religion.
There must be religion before there is symbol.

There must be understanding before there is engineering.
There must be engineering before there is technology.
There must be technology before there is understanding.

There must be meaning before there is ritual.
There must be ritual before there is magic.
There must be magic before there is meaning.

1.91-10 Axiom II Process of Means:

The processes of Learning, Wisdom, and Science, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with perception in the immanent, continuing with interaction in the omniscient, and completing with expression in the transcendent.

The processes of Method, Acceptance, and Mysticism, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with perception in the omniscient, continuing with interaction in the transcendent, and completing with expression in the immanent.

The processes of Divination, Knowledge, and Spirituality, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with perception in the transcendent, continuing with interaction in the immanent, and completing with expression in the omniscient.

The processes of Ceremony, Meaning, and Technology, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with expression in the immanent, continuing with interaction in the omniscient, and completing with perception in the transcendent.

The processes of Engineering, Symbol, and Magic, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with expression in the omniscient, continuing with interaction in the transcendent, and completing with perception in the immanent.

The processes of Ritual, Understanding, and Religion, have in common the essential dynamic of beginning with expression in the transcendent, continuing with interaction in the immanent, and completing with perception in the omniscient.

1.91-11 The Functional Basis of the Six Paths:

The theory of Spirituality always involves (is)
knowledge of divination.
The practice of Spirituality always involves (is)
learning of acceptance.
Being spiritual enables one to divine knowledge (have knowing).

The theory of Religion always involves (is)
understanding of ritual.
The practice of Religion always involves (is)
ceremonies of symbol.
Being religious enables one to ritualize understanding.

The theory of Science always involves (is)
learning of symbol.
The practice of Science always involves (is)
method of knowledge.
Being scientific enables one to learn wisdom.

The theory of Technology always involves (is)
meaningful ceremony (i.e., procedural mathematics).
The practice of Technology always involves (is)
engineering of understanding (i.e., to regard engineering as the design of transformations of form).
Being technical enables one to designate meaning.

The theory of Mysticism always involves (is)
acceptance of method.
The practice of Mysticism always involves (is)
divination of wisdom.
Being mystical enables one to implement acceptance.

The theory of Magic always involves (is)
symbol engineering.
The practice of Magic always involves (is)
rituals of meaning.
Being magical enables one to engineer symbols.

1.91-12 The Transitional Transformations:
Acceptance is the statement aspect of perception.
Knowledge is the structure aspect of perception.
Wisdom is the semantic aspect of perception.
Symbol is the statement aspect of expression.
Understanding is the structure aspect of expression.
Meaning is the semantic aspect of expression.

1.91-13 The Correspondences of the Practice of Path:
Learning and ceremony have the nature of the immanent.
Method and engineering have the nature of the omniscient.
Divination and ritual have the nature of the transcendent.

1.91-14 The Action of the Six Paths:
The practice of spirituality is the process of using
learning to create acceptance within the self.
The practice of science is the process of using
method to create knowledge within the self.
The practice of mysticism is the process of using
divination to create wisdom within the self.
The practice of religion is the process of using
ceremony to create symbols within the world.
The practice of technology is the process of using
engineering to create understanding within the world.
The practice of magic is the process of using
ritual to create meaning within the world.

1.91-15 The Basis of Law:
The Lawfulness of physics, the being of religion, and the implementation of technology,
are all based on the concepts of proximity and symmetry.
The Principles of magic, the being of spirituality, and the implementation of mysticism,
are all based on the concepts of similarity and continuity.
The Axioms (foundation) of metaphysics (correspondence patterns, isomorphisms, triplication),
are based on the concepts of inclusion and comparison.



Notes:
[1] All other subjects and studies are combinations or fractions of aspects of these six.
All domains (worlds) will (at least implicitly) involve some aspects of each of these six in all cultures.


Truth

1.58-1 Truth is more than "that which one can consider" (perceive) with total confidence, clarity, and certainty.
Truth is that with which (on the basis of which) one can personally act with total confidence and effectiveness.

Truth is not so much about correctness in thinking as it is about the significance and efficiency of choice.
It is not about the perception of -- or with -- certainty, as it is about expression with clarity, effectiveness, and confidence (note: true clarity is understood to mean 'without hidden agenda or deceit').

1.58-2 The basis for consideration of a truth is not only in the value that it actually has in clarifying thought (perception, theory) or even in the purposes to which it can potentially be applied (expression, practice), but also in the significance and meaningfulness that it gives to life (1). The meaning of a truth is more basic than its value or its purpose.

1.58-3 The evaluation of all deep truths must be defined equally in the being and experience of both subjectivity and objectivity. One knows as truth that which is validated by both the means of objective/reasoned forms, (impersonal) experiences and by the means of subjective/unreasoned feelings/intuitions (personal expressions).

One knows truth as much through the process of feeling as through the process of thought. Recognition of a truth requires that one place as full a reliance on personal subjective feeling (empirical validation) as one does on impersonal objective form (analytic proof). It is only with a clear synthesis (and analysis) of both feeling and form, the subjective and the objective, perception and expression, that one may know a metaphysical Truth in theory and understand its effectiveness (practicality) in life.

1.58-4 The concept of 'an absolute truth' is isomorphic with the concept of 'content which is totally/completely context independent'. In that the three Axioms and the three Modalities are about the relation between content and context and the manner in which both content and context are established, they can be regarded in themselves as context-independent, even though any expression of it is necessarily context-dependent.



Notes:
[1] No one is ever wholly wrong; there is always a grain of truth in whatever anyone says (or is in their being). Rather than focusing only on what is false, or who (or what) is at fault, wisdom involves focusing on whatever is true, whole (wholesome), valid, and right.



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