3 Natural Physics


Errors of Extrema

1.84-1 The Errors of Extrema of Self:

Prejudice: To refer to when expression is ultimately/absolutely independent of perception.

Reaction: To refer to when expression is ultimately/absolutely dependent on perception
(where reaction is mechanistic/deterministic).

1.84-2 The Errors of Extrema of World:

Realism: To refer to when perception is ultimately/absolutely independent of expression.

Idealism: To refer to when perception is ultimately/absolutely dependent on expression.

1.84-3 There is neither absolute dependence nor absolute independence; there is only interdependence (interaction).
In that only/ultimately interaction is real, none of the extrema are valid.

In that to be real (interdependent) is more basic and fundamental than both existence (independence) and objectivity (dependence), any existing objective theory of reality must (cannot not) inherently reject the four absolute extrema.

1.84-5 The third axis, a correction to the extrema, is the degree that a self spans multiple worlds (sets of perception and expression pairs) and that they co-influence one another. Consciousness is a higher order transcendental coherency linking the transformations of perception and expression.

1.84-4 Where reality is complex (many perceptions and expressions as interactions), the transformations of perception and expression (knowing and understanding, attitude and belief), must also inherently involve (cannot not involve) degrees of interdependence rather than (strict/absolute) dependence or independence. There can be no simple attitudes or beliefs; all of them are ultimately complex.


Symmetry and Continuity

1.43-1 Primary Operators: Where there is assumed a sameness of subjective context,
the following four definitions hold about the nature of the objective:

Continuity refers to where there is a sameness of content and a sameness of context.

Discontinuity refers to where there is a difference of content and a sameness of context.

Symmetry refers to where there is a sameness of content and a difference of context.

Asymmetry refers to where there is a difference of content and a difference of context.

1.44-9 The concept of similarity has common basis with the concept of continuity (via their basis in definition with the concept of "being the same").
The concept of proximity has common basis with the concept of symmetry (as "to be near one" is to equally have one be near the other).

The notion of foundational triplication is ultimately a notion of continuity. In asserting distinctness, inseparableness, and non-interchangeableness, the notion of foundational triplication asserts that there is a fundamental notion of continuity inherent in the very basis of all considerations of theory or of being.

The notion of type isomorphism is ultimately a notion of symmetry. In asserting that the basis concepts of a domain will have similar patterns of correspondences across changing domain contexts, the notion of type isomorphism asserts that there is a fundamental notion of symmetry inherent in the very basis of all considerations of theory or of being.

As such, the notions of symmetry and continuity are considered to be truly fundamental to any philosophic, scientific, or metaphysical consideration of the nature of self, reality, and the relation between them.


The Root Tautology

1.42-4 The Root Tautology: Comparison is isomorphic with interaction and relation (1).
The concept of comparison is isomorphic with the concept of interaction and the concept of relation (2).
All relations are interactions and are comparisons. All comparisons are interactions and are relations.

1.44-1 The meaning and essence of perception, as that which crosses the boundary of self, is the same as the essence and meaning of comparison (3). Perception and expression (each individually and together) are considered to be notions of the most basic type of interaction and relationship between self and reality.

The notions of relation, interaction, and comparison are basic primitive concepts. As per Axiom I, they are the ultimate coordinating basis of the descriptions, metaphors, and definitions of this metaphysics and are the prime examples of the nature of the immanent modality.

1.75-17 Parallel Aspect; 1st: To say that something is objective is to assert that it has both a high degree of symmetry across transformations of perception, and a low degree of continuity across transformations of expression.
To have a perfection of existence is to have complete symmetry in/of all transformations of (personal) perception and zero continuity in all transformations of expression. Existence is an observable eventity completely independent of the self.

1.75-18 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: To say that something is subjective is to assert that it has both a low degree of symmetry across transformations of perception, and a high degree of continuity across transformations of expression.
To have a perfection of creation is to have zero symmetry in/of all transformations of (personal) perception and total continuity in all transformations of expression. Creation is unobservable, totally unique, and isomorphic with a totality of self (i.e., a concept of God).



Notes:
[1] This is an assertion about the very being of comparison, as directly isomorphic with the very being of interaction and the very essence of the nature of relation itself.

[2] This is an assertion about the theory of comparison, interaction, and relationship, as a basis of theoretical understanding. As such, anything which is inherent in the nature of any one of these three is in essence also (necessarily) inherent in the others.

[3] The concept of comparison is considered to be a special case of the more general concept of interaction. Interaction itself is considered to be a special case of the more general concept of relationship. A measurement (an observation, regardless of kind) is an interaction.



The Universal Law

1.83-1 All knowledge of law, of dynamic process, both inner and outer, revolves around two fundamental concepts: that of symmetry and that of continuity. Where there is a concept of lawfulness, as a class, instances of this class (laws) will be of (only) two basic/fundamental types. Any instance of a law will either be a law of symmetry, or a law of continuity.

The basic beingness, nature, and lawfulness of all World is defined by, and founded upon, the concept of Symmetry.
The basic beingness, nature, and lawfulness of all Self is defined by, and founded upon, the concept of Continuity.

1.75-13 Objectivity has its basis in terms of symmetry. Subjectivity has its basis in terms of continuity.

The law of symmetry is the law of intradomain relations.
Symmetry is a sameness of content
where there is a difference of context.
It is the law of existence, of world, the law of physics, of substance, and of form.

The law of continuity is the law of interdomain relations.
Continuity is a sameness of content
where there is a sameness of context.
It is the law of creation, of self, of change, and of feeling.

1.83-2 Parallel Aspect; 1st: That which is external to the boundary of self, which is objective (has the nature of existence), also has the nature of the omniscient modality. As such, the basis of the lawfulness of that which is the content of perception will be defined in terms of symmetry. The deep lawfulness of the content of perceptions will be defined by the nature of symmetry laws.

1.83-3 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: That which is internal to the boundary of self, which is subjective (having the nature of creativity/ creation), also has the nature of the transcendent modality. As such, the basis for the lawfulness of that which is the context of perception will be defined in terms of continuity. The deep lawfulness of the context of perceptions will be defined by the nature of continuity laws.

1.83-5 Law of symmetry will apply to all that is of content. Law of continuity will apply to all that is of context.

1.43-5 The Two Principles of Ontological Dynamics:

The horizontal/objective aspects of interaction are defined by a symmetry of content
and an asymmetry of context.

The vertical/subjective aspects of interaction are defined by a discontinuity of content
and a continuity of context.

1.43-8 The Four Theorems of Being:

Subjective context is continuous. (Example: The nature and persistence of self identity).

Subjective content is discontinuous. (Example: The necessary diversity of thoughts and perceptions).

Objective content is symmetric. (Example: The law of conservation of matter and energy).

Objective context is asymmetric. (Example: The arrow of time).

1.43-2 The Incommensuration Theorem: Where applied to an absolute degree, the following theorems hold for any interaction (any comparison) in any domain:

When something is absolutely symmetric, it must also be intrinsically discontinuous.
When something is absolutely asymmetric, it must also be intrinsically continuous.
When something is absolutely continuous, it must also be intrinsically asymmetric.
When something is absolutely discontinuous, it must also be intrinsically symmetric.
Nothing anywhere at all can be both absolutely symmetric and absolutely continuous.
Nothing anywhere at all can be both absolutely asymmetric and absolutely discontinuous.

1.43-11 Analysis, as a process of division, emphasizes discontinuity to find symmetry.
Synthesis, as a process of joining, emphasizes continuity, and will find asymmetry.

Analysis has the nature of the omniscient. Synthesis has the nature of the transcendent.

1.43-3 Nothing (no interaction nor comparison) can be both perfectly/absolutely symmetric and perfectly/absolutely continuous. The concepts of symmetry and continuity are fundamentally and irreducibly incommensurate. Furthermore, nothing (no interaction nor comparison) can be both perfectly/absolutely asymmetric and perfectly/absolutely discontinuous. The concepts of asymmetry and discontinuity are also fundamentally and irreducibly incommensurate.

No comparison can regard content as both perfectly symmetric and continuous, or asymmetric and discontinuous.
This will hold for all scales, as well as for all positions in all domains.

One can conceptually examine the meanings of symmetry and continuity in the terms of parts and wholes. 'Wholes' have the meaning of 'that in the large scales' or of the macroscopic. 'Parts' have the meaning of 'the small scales' or of the microscopic. Similarly, the concepts of symmetry and continuity can be expressed in terms of microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic.

Symmetry is an assertion about the parts (the microscopic) that is made from the perspective of the whole,
(the macroscopic and/or the mesoscopic).

Continuity is an assertion about the whole (the macroscopic) that is made from the perspective of the parts,
(the microscopic and/or the mesoscopic).


Choice, Change, and Causality

1.61-1 The very fabric of the universe -- the fabric of consciousness -- is made up of change, causality, and choice. The beingness and reality of (the doing of) a/any/the/all worlds/selves is composed completely and entirely of only change, causality, and choice. Change, causality, and choice are the composition and basis of all-that-is.

Causality is defined as the subjective perception (context) of a consistency between two objective contents.

Choice is defined as the objective expression (content) of a consistency between two subjective contexts.

Change refers to the continuity of content and asymmetry of context of the interaction/definition of the subjective and objective.

1.61-2 Change, causality, and choice are distinct, inseparable, and non-interchangeable concepts.

Change, causality, and choice, although having identically distinct natures, are always found in intimate mixture with one another.
Change is never found in the complete absence of both causality and choice.
Causality is never found in the complete absence of choice and change.
Choice is never found in the absence of change and causality.

1.61-3 Change (complexity and consciousness) has the nature of the immanent modality.
Causality (actuality and conservation) has the nature of the omniscient modality.
Choice (potentiality and evolution) has the nature of the transcendent modality.

1.61-5 A class of choices is needed to beget an expression of one instance of change.
A class of changes is needed to beget the perception of one instance of causality.
A class of causality is needed to beget one choice.

1.63-3 Experiences and expressions are more basic than self and reality. Choices lead to changes, which become causes, which beget new choices, etc. All of these are inherently and irreducibly both objective and subjective. Both Reality and Self are inherently and irreducibly both objective and subjective, although reality must appear to be (as causal) only objective, and self must appear to be (in choice) only subjective.

1.61-7 The concept (and being) of choice (creation, potentiality, continuity) is conjugate with the concept (and being) of causality (existence, actuality, symmetry) with respect to the concept (and being) of change.

On approach to the scale of the microscopic limit of a domain (that smallest scale of interaction intensity/ complexity), the more that the application of this conjugation appears to take the form of a strict inverse (as opposition, rather than as conjunction). In this appearance, however, it is incorrect to therefore ignore (to define as inapplicable or invalid) either aspect of this conjugation. On approach to the scale of the macroscopic limit of a domain, the degree of the realness of either aspect of the conjugation is directly proportional to (inseparable from) the degree of the realness of the other.

1.54-1 For any world (domain), it will be (is) possible to create a theory (model) of the fabric of choice, change, and causality that is the basis of that world. This theory/model will be an abstraction of some aspects of the form of that world.

1.61-4 In the considerations of theory, the concept of change is more fundamental than that of choice and causality.
In practice, the assumption (appearance) of a primacy of basis between change, causality, and choice, will depend on the relative scale and modal orientation of one's perception of the world:

Perception which has an omniscient basis at the (objective) macroscopic limit (theory of physics, particular to a world) will regard all forms of choice as a form of, or derived from, causality.

Perception which has a transcendent basis at the (subjective) microscopic limit will regard all forms of causality (conservation, existence) as a form of, or derived from, choice (creation, in terms of ethics).

Within an immanent basis, at the mesoscopic limit (the boundary of the conscious and the unconscious), all perception will appear to be purely causal, and all expression will appear to be purely chosen (created, in terms of aesthetics).

1.61-13 The concepts of change, interaction, and comparison share the same modal class (immanent).
Each change, simple or complex, single or many, is an event (eventity).

1.61-14 Comparisons of changes (events) will modify (change) the apparent ratio of the degree that the change has a causal aspect to the degree that the change has a chosen aspect.
1.61-6 The more one goes into the world, the more that being seems to be defined by causality.
The more one goes into the self, the more that being is defined by (experience of) choice.
On the boundary between self and world, one finds only change.

1.63-1 Parallel Aspect; 1st: To the extent that events and dynamics seem remote and external to the self,
or are larger in scale than (the scale of) the self, or are regarded as 'unconscious'
(as external to the consciousness awareness of the self),
these events and dynamics will appear to be causal, objective, or reactive, with respect to that self.

1.63-2 Parallel Aspect; 2nd: To the extent that events and dynamics seem to be close and internal to the self,
or are smaller than (the scale of) the self, or of which the self is aware (as internal or within the 'conscious' awareness of the self),
these events and dynamics will tend to appear be chosen/ (at least in being stochastic), subjective,
or volitional/responsive with respect to that self.



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